Total Fundraised Income Rose by 3% in 2018

Total fundraised income for 2018 rose by 3% from 2017, according to the latest data from the Quarterly Fundraising Monitor.

This can be attributed, in part, to a major rise in Corporate Donations, which surged by a staggering 40%, as more organisations put a heavier emphasis on CSR and Charity Partnerships. Once again, the Social Services subsector saw the greatest individual rise in fundraised income with a 19% increase in 2018. Meanwhile, International organisations saw the largest decline with a 12% decrease in 2018.

The cost to raise a single euro was 29c, up from 25c in 2017, with organisations investing heavily in 2018 with the hope of seeing a return on investment in 2019.

Now heading into its fifth year, our participation service has been collecting data for the last four years, allowing not-for-profit organisations a way of benchmarking their fundraising performance against relevant subsectors. Most recently, we began running learning lunches with participants to discuss the current trends in the sector.

In the absence of true dedicated research, the monitor gives organisations a real time review of fundraising trends as well as providing evidence to the sector regarding the effectiveness of fundraising.

To find out more about the monitor click here. If you would like to discuss The Monitor in more detail, please contact Darren McMahon at Darren.mcmahon@2into3.com or on +353-1-234-3127.

Recruiting in full employment – How does the not-for-profit sector keep up?

In May 2019, the Central Statistics Office reported that the level of unemployment in Ireland had fallen to just 4.4%, quite a contrast from the 12.1% reported in May 2009.

The recent economic recovery has seen phenomenal growth in the number of job opportunities available, with the term “full employment” appearing more and more in news headlines.

Indeed, there are positive effects of full employment, such as improved income levels and GDP, reduced social protection payments and increased tax revenues that can be used either to reduce taxes or increase spending.

From an employer’s perspective, the current economic state can bring several challenges when seeking to both attract and retain the best people and the not-for-profit sector is certainly no exception. In fact, it may be feeling the impact even more than the commercial area.

Data on not-for-profit recruitment activity is somewhat thin on the ground, but the 2into3 Quarterly Recruitment Monitor can give us something of an insight into the last three years at least. During that time, the number of management roles advertised within the sector during the first half of the year has risen from 107 in 2017, to 201 in 2018 and a substantial 281 so far in 2019.

The cause of this trend is rooted in more than one area, with some possibly contradictory and maybe not mutually exclusive. Are there more organisations seeking to expand their activity and need to hire for new positions, or are senior managers moving to new roles with other organisations and need to be replaced? Are organisations who previously had no requirement to publicly advertise, or use the services of external recruiters now, having to make that shift in approach?

Whatever the root cause, the figures and the feedback we receive clearly points to a challenge for the sector. With a “sellers’ market” very much in operation at the moment, not-for-profit hiring managers need to know how to compete and to know who the competition is.

Commercial companies are often able to offer far more attractive overall packages to prospective employees, with higher salaries, greater opportunities for advancement and in many cases a range of other benefits.

The risk for not-for-profits is to try to compete head-on with such an offering. More often than not, this will be a losing approach, given the comparative resources available. Instead, organisations need to think outside this narrow framework.

Sure, there is a need to offer the most competitive salary and benefits package that the organisation can afford; after all, if you want to attract the best, you need to offer the best you can. But if this runs the risk of starting an “arms race” of competing salaries against companies who have deeper pockets than yours, other approaches are needed as well.

It is our experience that a large number of people working in the not-for-profit sector do so for reasons other than the salary they earn. They know the work, while often stressful and time-consuming, offers a purposeful career. They are often working within a culture that recognises and rewards their hard work and commitment, while offering a realistic work-life balance.

As long as this employment market exists, the challenge can also be viewed as an opportunity for the not-for-profit sector to promote its “employer brand” as something more than the basic elements of a job and salary.

Sports Capital 2018: Mapping Per Capita Trends by County

All of Ireland now looks to topple Dublin’s dominance in football. Like football, securing sports funding is another competition – it’s every county for itself. Over a weekend period last May, word began to spread about a Sports Capital Equipment-Only announcement, which came as no surprise on a week heading into European and local elections.

Many rural clubs and community groups were the first to hear of their success. Ireland is often a country of urban-rural divide; rural areas often feel like they are overlooked with perceived preference often given to Dublin. However, when it comes to the Sports Capital programme, this is not the case.

Allocation of 2018 funding has been divided, for the first time, into two tranches. Applications for only equipment-only were assessed and allocated first, with an announcement made last May. Those applications for capital (infrastructure), or a combination of capital with equipment, will be allocated in September according to recent public statements. In the recent May announcement, only the top 75% (by score received under the (DTTAS) Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport guidelines) of applications received funding, whereas in 2017 round every valid application received some funding. In addition, the trend of allocating more funding, on a per capita basis, to areas outside Dublin was more pronounced as illustrated in the table below.

“Sports Capital Equipment-Only Allocations,” Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport; “Census 2016,” Central Statistics Office, 2into3 Analysis.

In recent years, the Sports Capital Programme made headlines over political intervention and prioritisation of more favoured sports in ministerial backyards, particularly in Dublin. However, an examination of the previous local rounds of the Sports Capital programme shows that Dublin consistently lags behind the rest of the country, despite a plethora of cabinet ministers (and a Taoiseach) in the greater Dublin area. With the 2018 equipment round the gap, on a per capita basis, between Dublin and the rest of Ireland has widened significantly.

“Sports Capital Local Allocations 2018-2014,” Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport; “Census 2016, Census 2011,” Central Statistics Office, 2into3 Analysis.

Dublin clubs, in total, sought over €19.6 million from the local fund of the 2018 Sports Capital Programme. Outstanding 2018 applications are expected to be announced in September, with a new round expected to open in November. It will be interesting to see if some rebalancing of the allocations will occur and if Dublin can bag a few goals of their own.

Darren McMahon is a Consultant at 2into3, specialising in Sports Capital Consulting and Masterclasses. For more information, please contact Darren at Darren.McMahon@2into3 or +353-1-234-3127.

A New Playbook for Sports Governance

Last Friday, in partnership with Sport for Business, 2into3 held a panel discussion in the offices of Mason, Hayes & Curran to discuss ‘Governance in Sport’. The event was held in light of the recent scandals engulfing the Irish sporting world.

2into3 Director, Dennis O’Connor was delighted to take part in the panel discussion, chaired by Sport for Business CEO, Rob Hartnett. On the panel he was also joined by Maura Quinn, CEO of the Institute of Directors, Deirdre Garvey, CEO of The Wheel and Niamh Callaghan, a Partner at Mason, Hayes & Curran.

In what was a very well-attended event, we were also joined by six CEOs from Ireland’s foremost NGBs, along with members from the private sector who brought experience and deep knowledge of the importance of good governance.

The discussion proved to be very insightful. Although loosely based around the context of the last few months, the panel also discussed how the sporting world can learn from similar problems faced by the charity sector in 2013. The panellists then looked to the future, discussing the steps sporting organisations must take to ensure that these issues do not arise again.

Looking forward, the panellists suggested that good governance will ultimately come down to a willingness on the part of those in charge to accept and stand up for the three pillars of good governance; accountability, transparency and probity.

If you would like more information on the panel discussion, you can find the full report on the Sport for Business website by clicking here.

We would like to thank all those who attended on Friday and contributed to a very interesting discussion. We would also like to express our appreciation to both Mason Hayes & Curran and Sport for Business for their collaboration with 2into3 for this event.

Entries for the Good Governance Awards are now open!

We are delighted to announce that 2into3 are one of the partner organisations for this year’s Carmichael Good Governance Awards. The awards, now in their fourth year aim to acknowledge, encourage and promote good governance practice by not-for-profit organisations in Ireland.

The GGAs are open to organisations of all shapes and sizes. In total, there are five entry categories ranging from small (annual turnover of less than €250,000) to the very large (turnover of over €15million). Last year’s winners included organisations such as Care Alliance Link, CMRF Crumlin, Trócaire and Central Remedial Clinic.

As part of our partnership 2into3 Director, Dennis O’Connor, will join an esteemed panel of twenty-five judges who will adjudicate shortlisted entries and select the winners. The GGA Judging panel will also provide valuable feedback on all submissions to assist organisations in enhancing their governance.

Speaking about the awards, Dennis said: “The Good Governance Awards are a brilliant initiative designed to promote transparency in the sector. 2into3 are delighted to support the awards given that recent findings in our Annual Fundraising Performance Report suggest that a large number of organisations are not adhering to SORP requirements.”

The winners of this year’s GGAs will receive their awards at a special event with invited guests and will feature a high profile keynote speaker. The event is due to take place in the National Concert Hall of the 14th of November.

Entries for submission are now open and you can find out more information on how to apply here.

Federation of Irish Sport Annual Conference – What we learned?

The Conference asked the question if sport is the most inclusive community of all. Simply put, yes it is. Sport is one of the few communities that welcomes people from all communities, cultures, ethnicities and backgrounds. The key to successfully managing this is showing leadership and managing strong relationships. Cross-sectoral approaches form the basis of doing this successfully. The case studies of the GAA Healthy Club Project and Parkrun outline how sporting organisations work with the wider community and not-for-profit sector to bring diversity and inclusion into sport.

Parkrun is an Irish example of an organisation that collaborates outside of sporting circles. They work with charities, politicians and community groups, solely aiming to bring people together for the good of health, mental health and inclusivity. For example, the number of visually impaired participants has increased from 12 to over 170 in the space of one year. All participants take place in the same run. There is no segregation.

Questions arose about having segregated sporting teams, in regards to the like of LGBTQ+ sporting events for example. In an ideal world, we would not need to have such events. However, at the time of writing, young people either hide their sexuality or stop playing team sports at an early age due to “dressing room culture.”

Garreth Thomas addressed these points through discussing his own personal journey through sport. Without a doubt, there exists a strong element of homophobic abuse on and off the pitch in sport, which becomes a massive barrier for gay athletes. However, curtailing this issues will prove difficult. In the writers opinion, it will take a campaign on the level of “Kick it out.”

In what was a hugely insightful day, the overall message was simple, we need to change our behaviour when it comes to inclusivity in Sport. Wouldn’t it be great that instead of talking about disability sports, or the LGBTQ+ sporting community, we were just talking about the sport and the sporting community?

Sports Capital 2018 Equipment Round Announced

The Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport has allocated the 2018 equipment round of the Sports Capital Programme. In total, €9,790,544 has been allocated to local & regional projects with a further announcement on non-equipment projects expected in September of this year.

Over 500 clubs applied for equipment grants in 2018, of which 75% were successful in their applications. One of these clubs was Cricket Leinster, who worked with 2into3, on their application. They have been allocated €56,800 to help grow cricket in south Dublin and the wider Leinster Region.

Golf was the biggest winner from the equipment round taking 21.6% of the total allocation. Meanwhile, more prominent sports, such as GAA and Soccer, took 4.2% and 3.5% of the allocation respectively.

It is now time to look towards the 2019 Sports Capital round, which is expected to open in November. Funding is allocated based on the strength of the application and invalidity is avoidable if you plan correctly.

Since 2014, 2into3 have assisted six clubs achieve their Sports Capital grant, which totalled €834,800 in allocated funding with a further eight clubs awaiting a decision on their non-equipment projects in September. We have also delivered masterclasses on the application process to over 100 different clubs from many different sports such as GAA, Soccer, Rugby, Cricket, Basketball, Badminton and Golf.

If you would like more information on how 2into3 can assist your sport, club or school with a Sports Capital grant application, please contact Darren McMahon at Darren.McMahon@2into3.com or on +353-1-234-3127.

A New Playbook for Sports Governance?

Sport for Business and 2into3, in partnership with Mason Hayes and Curran are hosting a timely discussion on the challenges facing Irish sport with regard to Governance.

We have gathered a panel of smart thinkers in this space, taking reference from the Charity world and the changes that arose in that sector as well as how the public trust is being restored following a number of different challenges.

The Breakfast event, will take place at Mason, Hayes and Curran’s offices on Barrow Street, Dublin 4 on the morning of Friday, June 7th.

Together we will look at the following key issues:

  • The current landscape with regard to Sporting Bodies and how that compares to the world of Charities
  • Whether Self Governance is sufficient in the modern era of transparency
  • How increased regulation would impact on the voluntary sector within sport at all levels
  • What are the increased obligations that would apply and what other issues might come into play.

Our panel to discuss these and other issues that may arise are:

  • Deirdre Garvey, CEO of The Wheel
  • Maura Quinn, CEO of the Institute of Directors
  • Dennis O’Connor, Director of 2into3
  • Niamh Callaghan, Partner, Mason Hayes and Curran

The moderator will be Rob Hartnett, Founder of Sport for Business and Chair of the Dublin City Sport and Wellbeing Partnership

For more information on tickets click here: http://sportforbusiness.com/a-new-playbook-for-sports-governance/

Charities turn to CSR and Charity Partnerships in Q3, 2018

Corporate Donations in Q3, 2018 doubled compared to Q3 of the previous year. This is according to the latest data from the Quarterly Fundraising Monitor, suggesting that organisations are availing of more CSR projects along with a heavier emphasis on charity partnerships.

Meanwhile Fundraised Income also grew considerably in Q3 of 2018, with sector-wide growth of 12%. The Social Services and Health subsectors saw the biggest individual rises in fundraised Income with 40% and 20% increases respectively. International organisations, however, saw the biggest decline with a 26% decrease in Fundraised Income.

Interestingly, the cost to raise a single euro is currently 31c which may suggest that organisations were investing heavily in 2018 with the expectation of seeing bigger returns in 2019.

The Quarterly Fundraising Monitor, a participation service offered by 2into3, allows not-for-profit organisations a way of benchmarking their fundraising performance against relevant subsectors.

Lisa-Nicole Dunne, Director of Integration at CMRF and a long time user of The Monitor recently said ‘The Monitor gives us a real time review of fundraising trends and offers a sense of the return on effort and investment. The data from The Monitor means we are able to use an evidence informed approach when presenting ideas and strategies to board members’

If you would like to discuss The Monitor in more detail, please contact Darren McMahon at Darren.mcmahon@2into3.com or on +353-1-234-3127.

Darren McMahon promoted to Consultant

2into3 are delighted to announce that current Analyst, Darren McMahon, has been promoted to the role of Consultant within the company.

Darren has been working with us since January 2018 and has become a core member of the Consulting & Research team. In his time with us, Darren has managed our Quarterly Fundraising Monitor service as well as working within the Recreation & Sport subsector.

Going forward, Darren will still manage The Monitor, as well as continuing his work in sport. He will continue the development of our Sports Capital and Fundraising Masterclasses, as well as developing our Fundraising Strategy Development services.

We wish Darren continued success in his new role. If you wish you contact Darren, you can reach him on +353 1 234 3127, or Darren.McMahon@2into3.com.